Father Dolling's Home for Female Waifs, Hayling Island, Hampshire

In 1901, Robert Dolling, the vicar of St Saviour's, Poplar, established a camp at Hayling Island, Hampshire, to provide summer holidays for poor female 'waifs' from the East End of London. Father Dolling, as he was usually known, had previously set up similar camps for boys at Broadstairs, in Kent. The camps were all funded by donations from Dolling's friends and supporters.

Groups of girls spent two weeks at a time at Hayling Island. Their accommodation consisted of marquees in a large meadow in North Hayling, together with the schooner yacht, Siesta providing sleeping quarters.

Father Dolling's Camp for Female Waifs, Hayling Island, 1901.

Father Dolling's Camp for Female Waifs, Hayling Island, 1901.

Father Dolling's Camp for Female Waifs, Hayling Island, 1901.

Father Dolling's Camp for Female Waifs, Hayling Island, 1901.

After Father Dolling's death in 1902, the camps appeared to continue for a year or two. A Rest Home for Working Girls was also established in Dolling's name at Worthing.

Records

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  • None identfied at present — any information welcome.

Bibliography

  • None identified at present.